Photos copyright © 2010-2012, 2013 Kat Avila
Camera: Canon SD780 IS (2010-2012), Canon SX210 IS (2013)
American Avocet \'æ-vǝ-sɛt\, Recurvirostra americana: They swing their long, narrow bill side-to-side as they feed in shallow waters. Then they violently shake their head back and forth, perhaps to help them swallow. The contents of their gut include shell fragments and worms, as well as mud (Williams and Monroe, 11-12).
American avocet
2010.4.23
American avocet
2010.4.23
American avocet
2010.4.23
American avocet
2010.4.23
American avocet
2010.5.5
American avocet
2010.5.5
American avocet
2010.5.5
American avocet
2011.3.17
American avocet
in nonbreeding mode
with a gray pate
2011.4.11
American avocet
2011.4.11
American avocet
2011.4.11
American avocet
2011.4.11
American avocet
2011.4.11
American avocet
2011.4.11
American avocet
2011.4.11
American avocet
2011.4.11
American avocet
2011.4.11
American avocet
"Gotta pee!"
2011.4.11
American avocets
2011.4.18
American avocets
with long-billed dowitcher
2011.4.18
American avocet
2011.4.21
American avocet
"Now you see it . . ."
2011.4.21
American avocet
". . . and now you don't."
2011.4.21
A pair of avocets were harassing a mallard hen and her ducklings. For fun or for the feeding area, who knows. They didn't directly confront the hen, but targeted the ducklings. After some time, the avocets left the ducks alone.
American avocet
2011.6.3
American avocet
2011.6.3
American avocet
2011.6.3
American avocet
2011.6.3
American avocet
2011.6.3
American avocet
2011.6.3
American avocet
2011.6.3
American avocet
2011.6.3
American avocet
2011.6.3
American avocet
2011.6.3
American Coot (aka mud hen or marsh hen), Fulica americana
American coot
2010.4.23
American coot
2010.4.23
American coot
2010.4.23
American coot
2010.4.23
American coot
2010.4.23
American coot
2011.2.8
American coot
2011.2.23
American coot
2011.3.10
American coot
2011.3.15
American coot
2011.3.15
American Crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos, and Common Raven, Corvus corax
American crows
2010.5.5
American crows
"We waited and waited for you."
2011.3.17
American crows
"Whaddya say we go?"
2011.3.17
American crows
"I'm gonna poop on you
next time."
2011.3.17
American White Pelican, Pelecanus erythrorhynchos
American white pelican
2013.1.22
American white pelican
next to a
preening cormorant
2013.1.22
American white pelican
2013.1.22
American white pelican
riding thermals
2013.9.26
Black Phoebe, Sayornis nigricans
black phoebe
2011.1.25
Black-crowned Night-heron, Nycticorax nycticorax: Hard to see, but there are a pair of white plumes that drop from its dark crown.
black-crowned night-heron
An American avocet flies in
as the night-heron takes off.
2011.4.18
black-crowned night-heron
Western vervain in foreground
2011.4.18
black-crowned night-heron
"Hi-ho, hi-ho,
it's off to work we go!" ♫
2011.4.18
black-crowned night-heron
2011.4.18
black-crowned night-heron
2011.4.18
black-crowned night-heron
2011.4.18
black-crowned night-heron
2011.4.18
black-crowned night-heron
Swallowing a fish down.
2011.4.18
black-crowned night-heron
2011.4.18
black-crowned night-heron
"Ba-bye!"
2011.4.18
black-crowned night-heron
On the other side of the pond.
2011.4.18
Black-necked Stilt, Himantopus mexicanus
black-necked stilts
2011.2.25
stilts and teals
black-necked stilts
and cinnamon teals
2011.2.25
black-necked stilts
2010.4.23
black-necked stilt
2010.4.23
black-necked stilt
2010.4.23
black-necked stilt
2010.4.23
black-necked stilts
2010.4.23
birds
black-necked stilts,
American avocets, ducks
2010.7.9
Bushtit, Psaltriparus minimus, in bushes of California encelia
bushtits
"What are you doing
upside down?"
2011.1.27
bushtits
2011.1.27
bushtits
2011.1.27
bushtit
2011.2.3
bushtit
This one is swinging up
and down on stalks of
California bulrush.
2011.4.11
California Quail, Callipepla californica: At first, I thought it was a rabbit, then a mourning dove. When I got closer, I realized there was a pair of quail. In a year of hiking the sanctuary, I had never seen them before.
California quail
in area of Pond 4
2011.4.11
California quail
2011.4.11
Canada Goose, Branta canadensis: It's a Canada goose, not a Canadian goose. One of the most moving sights you can experience is a V-formation of migratory Canadas honking by overhead, moving at 20-30 miles per hour (C. Williams, p. 116) and flying at altitudes of 750-3,500 feet (Bellrose, p. 155). There are eleven recognized varieties, which are distinguished from each other by size, i.e., lightweights (small), middleweights (medium), and heavyweights (large) (C. Williams, p. 3). Southern California tends to get the larger, more resonant honkers flying in from nearby northeasterly states (Bellrose, p. 147). The geese have a 28-day incubation period, and you are likely to see goslings between mid-March and early May (C. Williams, p. 31).
Canada goose
2011.3.11
Canada goose
2011.3.11
Canada goose
2011.3.11
Canada goose
2011.3.11
Canada goose
Before flying off, quick
honking with head bobbing.
2011.3.11
Canada goose
Takeoff!
2011.3.11
Canada goose
close-up on wing
2011.3.11
Cedar Waxwing, Bombycilla cedrorum
cedar waxwing
2011.11.23
Cinnamon Teal, Anas cyanoptera: The male (drake) cinnamon or red teal has red eyes and light blue shoulder patches. Almost all cinnamon teal spend their winters in regions south of the United States. Of those that winter in the U.S., most are in California (Bellrose, p. 288).
cinnamon teal
2011.2.25
cinnamon teal
2011.2.25
cinnamon teal
2011.2.25
cinnamon teal
"What's back here?"
2011.2.25
cinnamon teal
2011.2.25
cinnamon teal
2011.1.27
cinnamon teal
2011.2.25
cinnamon teal
2011.3.7
cinnamon teals
American coot in foreground
2011.11.23
cinnamon teals
Could be juveniles. Not sure.
2011.11.23
cinnamon teal with northern shovelers
with Northern Shovelers
2013.10.31
cinnamon teal with northern shovelers
2013.11.19
Cliff Swallow, Hirundo pyrrhonota: At the Campus and University overpass.
cliff swallow
2010.5.14
cliff swallow
2010.5.14
Double-crested Cormorant, Phalacrocorax auritus: An inland cormorant.
double-crested cormorant
2011.1.27
double-crested cormorant
the Loch Ness monster
2011.3.15
double-crested cormorant
2011.3.15
double-crested cormorant
2011.3.15
double-crested cormorant
flying from Pond 2 island
2011.11.23
double-crested cormorant
swimming in Pond 1
2011.11.23
double-breasted cormorant juvenile
juvenile
2013.11.19