"This park was once part of Rancho Trabuco, granted to Santiago Arguello in 1841 by the Mexican Governor Alvarado. The land eventually became the property of James Flood, a wealthy San Francisco businessman, and Richard O'Neill Sr., a former butcher and packing house owner. Both had immigrated to California during the gold rush."
O'Neill Regional Park brochure

Photos copyright © 2013 Kat Avila
Camera: Canon SX210 IS
Notes: There are mountain lions in the area, though this population will soon disappear due to inbreeding, which underlines the importance of maintaining wilderness corridors. One man said he has only seen the tail of one disappearing over a ridge. A young woman who regularly hikes the area has seen two lions deeper in the canyon at night, and her mother spotted one in a tree while horseriding in the afternoon; these are their only sightings during a lifetime of living here.
General Landscape
dog poop bags
dog poop bags
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sign
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sign
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sign
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icy pellets of hail
hail along the trail
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California scrub oak
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landscape
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landscape
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landscape
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trail steps
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trail
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dead tree
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tree trunk
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tree trunk
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landscape
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landscape
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riverbed
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landscape
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nature center
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nature center garden
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nature center garden
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landscape
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California buckwheat
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landscape
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landscape
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landscape
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landscape
What was this used for?
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landscape
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landscape
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landscape
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landscape
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landscape
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landscape
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landscape
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pile of dead leavesleaves swept together
by rain
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landscape
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river-depth marker
river-depth marker
up to 8 feet
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park
Mesa day-use area
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coals
coals on barbecue grill
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dry leaves on the ground
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overlooking the Foothill Transportation Corridor
overlooking the Foothill
Transportation Corridor
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overlooking the Foothill Transportation Corridor
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landscape
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crumbling rocks
rocks crumbling apart
due to natural processes
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log
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tree
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beneath the freeway
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trailway
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Arroyo Trabuco Wilderness (section near Arroyo Vista access point)
pathway
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field
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tree
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riverbed
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tree
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landscape
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landscape
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landscape
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landscape
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landscape
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Animals
Brush Rabbit, Sylvilagus bachmani, HARE AND RABBIT FAMILY
brush rabbit
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brush rabbit
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brush rabbit
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brush rabbit
hiding in the prickly pear
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California Ground Squirrel, Spermophilus beecheyi, SQUIRREL FAMILY: They are all over the place. Their habit is to freeze in place when they see you while a sentry squeaks a steady alarm call.
California ground squirrel
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ground squirrel
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ground squirrels
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ground squirrels
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ground squirrel
"Let me know when
I can move again."
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Mule Deer (aka Black-tailed Deer), Odocoileus hemionus, DEER FAMILY
deer scat
deer scat
(tubelike pellets)
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Insects
Honey Bee, Apis mellifera
honey bee
lapping up moisture
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honey bee
lapping up moisture
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